Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Backyard visitors

This past week, my backyard has seen a lot of excitement and odd visitors.  So I do not have to go far to enjoy the wilds of Idaho.

First of all came the seed crackers.  The Red-breasted Nuthatch and the Brown creeper to join the flickers, chickadees and other wintering birds.



 
Saturday morning I looked out the back window and found this young bull moose that had lost his antlers trying to enjoy the grandkid's play things.  The tree it is looking at is their favorite climbing tree and it, and the swings are part of the "Ninja" course we set up for the energetic kids during the summer.  He appeared to want to run the course.
He had left several piles of fresh "green olives" around the lawn and I suggested to the kids that we dip them in chocolate and sell them as snacks.  Their mothers discouraged that.



On Sunday morning I found the moose sleeping in my garden.  He decided to stop by the neighbor's outhouse before heading to the river bottoms, but he found the door shut.  I am sure he thought that the "R" on the R Mountain was referring to the outhouse as the "restroom."
 
There are a lot of blessings living between the Teton and Henrys Fork Rivers - and near the wilds of Idaho. 

6 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

love your bird visitors but am glad i don't have to worry about a moose wandering through my yard! just the occasional mule, horse, dog, cow or various wild critter here.

Barb said...

Hi Bill, Great moose photos - we get them in our yard, too. There is a growing moose population in CO. You get a greater variety of birds than we do at high altitude.

Michelle said...

And here I thought having the neighbor's horse and donkey in my yard was problematic!

Monts said...

Great images Bill, love the Moose the only thing we get in the backyard is the neighbours cat.
By the way Falmouth has not changed a bit its still the same as 1965.

Mary Cromer said...

Very nice share and that little Nuthatch is gorgeous. We have the White-breasted species here~

troutbirder said...

Most interesting visitors there, Bill. Unfortunately Moose are disappearing in Northern Minnesota and the scientists don't know why...